State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout – Eligibility, Amount and Payment Date!

In response to what has been referred to as “injustice” in the State Pension, Alan Brown, the SNP MP for Kilmarnock and Loudoun, is pleading with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to provide £10,000 in compensation to WASPI women’s group.

State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout

The subject of State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout is a payment campaign for women born in the 1950s who were impacted by the UK’s state pension age changes. 

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The women, represented by the advocacy group Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI), contend that the government misled them about the increase in their state pension age from 60 to 65, causing them financial hardship and distress. 

Recently, a bill proposing a compensation plan for the WASPI women was put out by an MP as part of the movement to seek political and legal solutions for the incident. According to the plan, females would get £10,000 or more in lump payments each week of pension they had missed. 

Who is eligible for State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout? 

The results of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman’s (PHSO) continuing inquiry and the potential compensation plan put forth by MP Alan Brown will determine who is eligible for the State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout. 

State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout

But in general, women who were born between April 6, 1950, and April 5, 1960, and who were impacted by the sudden and insufficient notice of the state pension age increase from 60 to 65 are the ones who may be eligible for the payout. 

These females have advocated for justice and acknowledgment of their circumstances under the name WASPI (ladies Against State Pension Inequality). Campaigners have claimed compensation, claiming that the DWP failed to properly disclose the change. 

What actions has been taken by MP Alan Brown regarding State Pension Age Waspi? 

The PHSO can determine how compensation should be distributed according to different bands, the greatest of which is Level 6, where impacted parties get reimbursements of at least £10,000. In his newly introduced bill, MP Alan Brown suggested that the highest band of compensation be applied, and he required the DWP to lay out a compensation plan. 

“It is a disgrace that there is no settlement for the 3.8 million WASPI women,” he stated in Parliament. Just as those 3.8 million women were ready to retire, they received the shocking news that their state pension age would rise from 60 to 65. By then, it was too late to make any meaningful financial plans. 

Many were already suffering from poor health or worse, while others had retired early and were preparing to live off of savings until they were 60, at which point they anticipated receiving their state pension.”

About the State Pension Age Waspi, MP Alan Brown has taken the following actions:

  • On February 7, 2024, he brought a 10-Minute Rule Bill to the House of Commons, requesting that the government release recommendations for a compensation plan for the impacted women. 
  • During the bill reading, he shared the experiences and views of a few WASPI women from his area and throughout the UK.
  • His measure was supported by the SNP, his party, and a few other MPs; it was approved on its first reading without any opposition. 
  • He is getting ready for the bill’s second reading, which is set on April 19, 2024.

Does the State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout have an official solution? 

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is still looking into the State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout, and a potential compensation plan brought up by MP Alan Brown is awaiting a second reading in the Commons. 

As a result, there is still no formal remedy in place. Nevertheless, the measure put out by MP Alan Brown proposes that the impacted women need to have a one-time payment of £10,000 for each week of their lost pension. While some MPs are in favor of this bill, it is unclear if the administration or the Parliament would approve it. 

When will the State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout Solution be announced by officials? 

There is currently no specific time frame for the announcement of the State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout by the officials because the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is still investigating the matter and the House of Commons is still considering a second reading of a potential compensation plan set forth by MP Alan Brown. 

The PHSO report, according to some sources, may be released by the summer of 2024, and MP Alan Brown’s bill introduction is set on April 19, 2024. As a result, the official announcement may occur in the second half of 2024, depending upon the resolution of the administrative and political activities.

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156 thoughts on “State Pension Age Waspi Female Payout – Eligibility, Amount and Payment Date!”

  1. The government will not pay out on this they find a excuse not to payout it’s sad and. Upsetting to say the least and woman in this position suffers it’s been going on for years and still no end to getting it I’m not holding my breath I get it

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      • I was 62.5 yrs old before I received my pension. In which time I was expecting my pension at 60yrs. I was made redundant from my job at the passport office but had to use my redundancy pay to keep my family. My husband was diagnosed with terminal cancer at the same time so the redundancy was gone as we received no pension at all my husband was the same age as me. Unfortunately he died 3yrs later. It was such a struggle as it still is trying to catch up with debts.

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    • Somehow I think you are right. I was born March 1954 and am nearly 70 years old. I suffered greatly financially and am still today. I really hope if there is any justice we all get what’s owing to us.

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      • I feel the same, I was born in 1951 and was one of the first to be hit by this change, it has had a massive affect on my finances, I retired at 68 and at the age of 70 I took a part time job to make ends meet, I see this is what I have to continue doing, it’s a disgrace how we have been treated.

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      • October 1954 for me so one of the first to full age of 66 my life would have been so different and the peanuts comment from my MP Rishi Sunak was , you’ll be better off by £10 on the new state pension 😂😤

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        • October 53 for me. I too had to wait until I was 65.
          The sad fact is that many of us are 70 now, many with serious health problems.
          I fear this will drag out for years.

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      • Ann I’m 70 next month and still working full time. They will drag this on as long as they possibly can in the hope that more of us will die working ourselves to death! I’m fuming 😡

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      • I worked for the NHS. And never had a clue about my retirement age going to 66. Like all the rest of us, I was shocked and very unprepared to have to work till I was 66. And iam still working at nearly 68 and will be doing so for a long time. Iam a Chef not the easiest of jobs. As I get older. And yes it’s definitely time this so called government we have. Got of there golden perches and came into the real world. £10.000 a year against £80,000 a year. There a joke. Let’s hope it gets sorted before we all pass away.

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    • I think we are all thinking the same at this stage.Just seems there is no light at the end of the tunnel.I will believe it when I see it.x

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    • one-time payment of £10,000 for each week of their lost pension. I’m hoping this was a typo, if not a lot of people are going to be disappointed!

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        • I saw that and it must be a typo and it makes thing confusing as have we all lost the same ie six years, or Im I being thick. I am 1958 literally retire on Friday, yeaahhhh
          Had to work 6 years longer, suffered anxiety depression
          Also in those extra years paid into a company which id not have paid into

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    • What a disgrace the government are.Too many years have past regarding this matter,it doesn’t matter what your life is like the injustice had occurred through no fault of their own.I am one if these women I paid all my insurance and taxes for what, 6 more years work when I should have been enjoying my retirement, they have been found out and they should pay these women what they are owed.Its about time heads should roll in the government too many injustices are being found out.

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        • I totally agree, no 1 really understands the full impact n implicstions of this diabolical treatment of waspi women. Shocking too that its been dragged out for so long that some women wont ever receive justice and compensation due to them dying. So sad.

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      • Women wanted equality and you got equal retirement age and now apart from having 5 years extra retirement than men you want a reward for it, when I was working a big mouthed woman in the factory xomainedcit was u fair men could work untill they were 65 but women couldn’t, that discrimination was against men but whatever happens women always make out its against them, your hypocrites and greedy grabbers who want rewarded for having better rights than men.

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        • That’s not the complaint David, I received only months notice that I couldn’t retire. I’d actually put in for my pension, only to be told I couldn’t retire. It’s been proved that DWP is guilty of maladministration.

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        • You obviously have a complete and utter misunderstanding of the history pertaining to these women. We’re you deprived of educational opportunities because of your gender? We’re you groomed for a lifetime of solely being a stay at home parent? And when allowed to work, we’re you paid substantially less than the man standing beside you? No Equal Pay Act back then. We’re you only able to take lower paid part time work because you had to care for your kids? You show no understanding of the past experiences of these women who lived very different lives to women of today. And to those of you who say they should have known about the changes; how for goodness sake? In 1995, many could not afford a computer. Nor would they have had smart phones. As for the adverts, it was cartoon dogs chatting and it only appeared in highbrow publications like the FINANCIAL TIMES! Oh, and yes, the DWP did send details out to Financial Advisors. Of course, all these women will have retained the services of an FA to manage their oodles of wealth. And don’t forget, many of these ladies worked hard paying taxes and NIC at much higher levels than you do now, to put younger people through education, training and to support the NHS. And last but not least, WASPI actually does not oppose the increase in the retirement age; they merely assert that clear and timely notification should have taken place to allow those affected to take appropriate action. After all, the government could access addresses for the vast majority of these women. Surely a letter, back in 1995 would have been an easy option for DWP. I did eventually get a letter – only 15 months before reaching 60. Please don’t try to tell me and others that this is fair treatment. And please refrain from making obviously biased and ill researched comments. To all of you jumping in without understanding the issues, please stop. You’re making yourselves look very stupid.

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        • Your so rude & wrong woman work all day then cook clean feed the family including the husband woman work round the clock 24 hrs a day with little rest weekend consist of doing every ones washing including the husbands clothes .grand children & grand children are supported with many of us grand mothers double school runs ect baby sitting .we deserve our pension .we payed into it all our lives I was born in 1959 have always worked payed tax brought my kids up well educated they are proffesional teachers nurses ect . At 65 I should be able to put my feet up & live of my pension .

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        • I’m not sorry to say you’re a clueless mysoginist.
          Basing your whole biased narrative on one woman’s opinion is ridiculous.
          This is nothing to do with equality but maladministration by the government in terms of the amount of notice 50s women were given.
          But don’t let facts get in the way of your hatred.

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      • If it sounds too good to be true then it is.. I was born Dec 5th 1957 and I had to wait until I was 66 to receive my pension
        . Good luck to all the cheated women including myself.. To get the answers they need and are looking for..!!

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      • YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY RIGHT,WHEN WILL THIS SO CALLED GOVERNMENT GOING TO PAY THE WASPI WOMEN WHAT THEY WERE ROBBED OF!!! IS IT GOING TO BE THIS GOVERNMENT THAT WILL DO THE RIGHT THING!!! OR WILL THEY PAY THE PRICE AT THE GENERAL ELECTION!!! WHEN EVERY WASPI LADIES, AND ALL OF THEIR FRIENDS +FAMILIES,SHOW THEM UP FOR WHO THEY ARE “THE CONSERVATIVE PARTY” EVERY WEEK THAT PASSES IT IS GETTING NEARER TO THE ELECTION ” DO NOT FORGET LADIES M.P.ALAN BROWN IS FIGHTING YOUR CORNER FOR YOU,JUST LIKE ALAN BATES IS DOING FOR THE POST OFFICE STAFF!!!

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    • People who were born in the 1950 worked all there lives from fifteen most of us never claimed anything. Looking forward to retirement unfortunately had to work extra five to six years now 70yrs old government should be looking after the people that have worked hard all there lives there is no respect for our generation shame on you

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      • I was born in 1952 and thought I would get my pension. I worked from 16 years old and am disgusted as I paid NI and taxes and are treated like beggars. Also 2 years after I got my pension the new pension went up and we have lost out twice. I was divorced and really struggled to survive. I am angry

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        • I was born 1952, I lost my husband in 2004 aged 53. Had to carry on working, just to survive, as you said the pension changed and we were left to struggle. Not at all fair when we’ve worked all our lives from 16yrs of age.

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        • I totally agree Sheila. I too was born in 1952 and had to work longer and only get the old pension. Not fair any way you look at it as the gap is getting larger year by year.

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      • You miss the point it’s the fact that there was no warning that they would need to work longer which gave them no time to make any financial plans men already knew their retirement age
        Don’t get me wrong I think the retirement age for both should be the same but it was the fact there was little to no warning

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      • Men went to work so did women but men relaxed when they got home women had to do house work cook clean house look after children school runs and pick ups what the hell you griping about I never had time to go out enjoying a drink with friends all my money went on children men got it a lot easier than women

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    • Tina I waited until I was 64 and a half for my pension to start. If I’d not had access to my occupational one I’d have been up the creek without a paddle. As for communication, do t get me started. The second time I had an inkling of delay was via my local bus authority who issued me with just a local pass as opposed to the nationwide one I was expecting. When I rang them it was Merseyside transport office who informed me that my pension was delayed yet again.
      I have just 1 letter in my possession from DWP which gave the impression that I would have a delay of months NOT years.
      To say that I am angry doesn’t come near. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever see the money.
      It will be structured in such a way that even if there is a payout it will be means tested, then taxed. Plus the longer the delay the more of us will be dead !
      It makes me very angry when you watch on a daily basis the government wasting OUR money (as in everyone who pays tax) on a daily basis. Incompetent doesn’t even begin to describe what goes on in this country

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    • Same, found out about it quite by chance, then cried as health failing. I have oesteoarthritis of the hip n inadequate financial resources worked all my life brought up 4 kids got jobs in schools i got 2,500 lump pension n 33.00 a month. I work 2 days a week n will be better off on state pension/not working, than i am at the present moment/working. At present earn 125.00 week for 2 days but when i retire 200.00 a week for doing nothing! Hurry up retirement while i still have a bit of health left in me. There shudnt be any1 working past age 65 i.m.o. give the jobs to the youth.

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    • I totally agree with you, govt will keep delaying this until we’re all dead! They don’t care about the majority with any issue! They will keep fleecing us, poverty & ill-health will continue to rise. Sad & true cry 😭

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    • Think a typo and it’s perhaps £10k per year. I feel the raise in pension payment ensures no pension credit claim but perhaps I’m cynical – broke and cynical.

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  2. I will be a struggling pensioner born in 1958.
    I don’t have enough money to live on when
    I retire in April this year.
    I have worked since I was 16 and still I won’t have a struggle free retirement.
    A payment for this error would be greatly appreciated and a massive help to me to be able to draw from it on a weekly basis to top up the state pension.
    I sincerely hope this will happen.

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      • After being owed over £25000 they think 10k is good enough!
        I feel like I’ve lost a pound only to find a penny 🤦🏼 and being outside of the UK will pay tax on it

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    • Carole,thought I was going to retire at 60,after working all my life,to be told I have to go till my 66th birthday, was heart reaching, my heath as deteriorating ever since,have,emphysema in both Lungs,scleritisi both eyes, had to sale house and downsize due to not getting my pension till 66,hope we get something as it will help,

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    • I didn’t even receive a letter so you can imagine the disappointment when I eventually found out totally disgusted to say the least worked from I was 16 with no breaks 😡

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  3. I have been watching and waiting all the time waspi has been around . I’d like to thank them for all they have achieved so far and what is to come . Being unable to work when I had my son in my 40s was a gift in a way as he was poorly but once he left school and improved I had to start looking at ways to get money for us so last year I got myself a job for a trial period and decided to stop once I found out my partner was very poorly . In all of this time I contacted Andy Street . Kier Starmer and various people in parliament including our own MP for the area . Most responded but were not able to give me definite answers I told them I was watching waspi news . I don’t know about other women my age but I’ve felt ignored after age 60 no one has helped us benefits aren’t available for certain people even though our situation met criteria . Government has stopped everything good until now , let’s start being heard and visible ladies 👍I really look forward to the results . Thankyou waspi

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    • Totally agree with what you say. I was born 1955 and worked from the age of 15. I do not trust this government one little bit. I tried to continue working after the age of 60. My partner and I moved and I got a part time job but my knee was so bad and after several falls had a total knee replacement. Once better I tried so hard to get another job but no one would have me (ageism). So we ended up living on my partner’s salary until he became poorly and struggled then on his savings. I would not wish that time again on anyone but I can just see the government putting all manner of new rules in the way of being able to claim the compensation (if it is ever resolved, I think they are waiting for us all to die).

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      • Will we ever be compensate it taking so long lots of people have died waiting for this and I expect many more before it actually sorted

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  4. Well done Alan
    I believe that all the ladies
    That didn’t get pension at 60
    Have missed out on nearly £10,000 a year
    And it should be paid to all who it was taken from
    It’s a disgrace 😞😞

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    • Totally agree with you on this one Rita I was born in 1954 and retired in 2016 but didn’t get my pension until four years later and I struggle, I was one of those who didn’t receive any notices that the pension age was changing. Let’s hope we get what’s ours.

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  5. I had to stay beyond 60 to get my state pension .As a result I was not able to retire until I was 66. Having to still giving to mortgage due to a short fall on our endowment Mortgage we did not have extra money to retire comfortably.

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    • I to should retire at 60,but my manager told me that by new law I retired at 66years. I had work 6 years more.My health become terrible. I had osteoporosis and arthritis. Had few fracture. And know I still walk with two scruches. If I retire at 60 May I don’t sick.

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    • Hi I agree my sister died. 67 in December 2023 she was hoping she would see a positive outcome for waspi women. I’m 66 I’ve had to take semi retirement as I can’t afford to fully retire why don’t they just pay ou

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      • If it was men it happened to they would have been paid by now it makes me sick. Put women in charge the world would be a better place.

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    • A massive thank you to all the WASPI ladies who have been fighting this injustice for years. I retired last December at 66 but had to give up work 3 years earlier due to chronic health conditions, which I am sure were exasperated by having to work the extra years. My health problems may have been delayed if I had been able to retire at 60, I feel robbed of a quality life due to the sudden increase in retirement age with no notice.
      Keep up the fight ladies.

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      • If it was men it happened to they would have been paid by now it makes me sick. Put women in charge the world would be a better place.

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  6. I am a 69 year old woman ! Worked from the age of 15 , paid 51 years national insurance and have brought my children up to WORK and my grandchildren to Work ! and they do , I have helped with child care and cared for my mam ( end of life ) which I had to reduce my working hours to enable me to do this in 2014 as I was due to retire august 2015 ! only to find out when I made enquiries over the phone about my state pension that I couldn’t retire for a further 5 years and then told a few months later it would be 6 years , happy retirement not !!! this cost me my home 🥲 and many more women the same treatment, !! this government are a disgrace and need to try doing some hard manual work that takes its toll on your health and see if they can continue working till 70+. 😉 don’t think so.

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    • I am 69. At 59 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Sat in the hospital thinking I only had 12 months to work,I contacted the department for a projection after 42 years working some part time nights as I have four children. The first bomb shell was contributions had gone from 30 years to 35. However the nuclear explosion was being told my state pension would not be paid until I was 65. I cried. I think it is a cunning plan of the government that pensioners pass away. Thank you so so much for taking up the battle for those who make it.

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      • I was born in 1955 and expected to retire when I was 60 but then the age changed to 66. I foolishly remarried after my divorce to a conman who took all I had (long story) and after a nasty fall at work had to retire last year. I now have to pay 3/4 of my state pension to rent as I lost my home to above. I had to stay and work after 66 to be able to try and save a little but due to accident have saved very little.
        I applaud and thank waspi ladies for their long fight and hope we all get what we are due.

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  7. I retire in June I had no notice ime working 16 hrs a week early mornings
    I am a cleaner it’s hard work I have arthritis in my ankle
    I’ve been on waiting list for over 2 year for a triple ankle fuse ime struggling now when I finish my shifts I have to rest my foot 66 is to old to be doing manual work and the goverment want to put up the retirement age again
    I’ve only got my state pension to rely on in June £10-000 would be an absolute lifeline for me and so many others we have worked since the age of 15 please do the right thing

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    • This government are dragging this issue out and have no intention to pay anything before an election as they know that it will not have any chance of government after it. We need to make it a big part of any election manifesto and let Candidates know it will be a vote issue.

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  8. I found out on my 58th birthday when I said just 2 years to go and a colleague said you might want to check that – I never received any official notification. I worked from the age of 18, had 2 daughters and was back at work 6 weeks after their births. I was married for 46 years, retired at 66 and my husband died 3 months after my retirement.

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  9. I thank everyone who has continued to fight this cause. Being an unpaid carer for the last five years, me and my husband have to live off our savings, which as dwindling. I should have my state pension to help us. The government will delay this forever if possible just like trying to quieten the post office scandal. Waspi needs to be in the headlines of every media possible until the government dig deep and pay us what is due.

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  10. I was born in 1959, but can not apply until I am 66, my sister who is a year older than me has had to work within an inch of her health and I suspect that I will toooo

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  11. I was born in 1955 . And was robbed by the government by not having my pension till I was 66 years old .
    It was hard working an extra 6 years.
    But had to as I couldn’t afford to retire without my pension. it has affected my health.
    I started working soon after leaving school at 15 years old. And have worked hard and have paid my National Insurance in full .

    I had no letter from the government to inform me of the changes they had made . I realised when I watched the news . And I cried.

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    • Born Oct 54 had to wait right until 66 & then don’t get the full amount due to paying into bank pension which crashed to less than half expected got me twice

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  12. I was born in the 1950’s too and had no letter informing me of an increase to my retirement age to 66 years. I am due to retire this April struggling to earn a few bib to get by having suffered an accident in 2021 leaving me in pain every day. I have not claimed any benefits whatsoever. I’ve had financial help from my wonderful Mom ..well done WASPI ladies for your never ending campaigning.. we ladies of the 1950’s deserve our compensation from our government NOW

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    • I was born in 1955 and left school in 1971.I worked for over 50 years and was also unable to retire until age 66 .I also had nothing in writing, it was a shock .You think I’ve worked hard since the age of 15 and still no compensation. I’m hoping the government pull their weight and pay up what they owe us .Thankyou WASPI

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    • I was born 1953 should have finished at 60
      Then told I would have to work till I was 63 and 2 months.
      Low and behold it changed again and I had to work till I was 65. We didn’t have a say in it.

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    • I was born in 1955. I have worked throughout. Having 3 children with the break of maternity leave and back to work thereafter paying childminders. I have worked in the care sector looking after our elderly mostly on minimum wage. Hoping to retire at 60. Carried on working until 66 with my NI paid from the age of 16. I’m elderly now needing financial help. Who is looking after me?? Come on government care for your elderly women. If we owed you money we would be in court by now! Look after us. Big massive thanks to waspi for fighting our cause

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  13. Also had to work extra 6 years in a very demanding heavy lifting factory job. My health has suffered for it and am now a pensioner living on what they give me weekly which is not enough. Had no time to prepare for this. It is a scandal!

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  14. I was born in 1959, always worked hard and paid my dues, had two children one of which I bought up on my own for 10 years, with no maintenance or help from ex husband, I worked full time and have paid full NIS contributions
    I had to ‘retire’ from work in 2019 due to my ill health and to be carer for my husband who was diagnosed with secondary cancer
    All our savings have gone, we have downsized and cut back as much as we can, I still have another 2 years to wait before I get my pension !! It’s another disgraceful cover up from the successive governments, who will string this out for as long as they can
    WASPI women are doing a great job but we need the sort of coverage from the media that the post office scandal has seen over the last few months
    Women are always treated unfairly and need maximum exposure to shame the government into action NOW

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  15. Worked all my life looking forward to retiring at 60 to then look forward to easing down and enjoying life with my young grandchildren then lo and behold I suddenly find out I have an extra six years to work no notice of this found out from a friend who is a few months older than me… already have arthritis and back pain from physical jobs over the years my days of taking it easy with happy smiling beautiful babies and dirty nappies gone in the blink of an eye. Had to go back to full time work to stay afloat and make ends meet ridiculous. Now 67 on full pension I have to choose some months between heating and eating. We have been thrown away and stamped all over for long enough not one of the governments have any idea what torture they have put us through they all have their nice big pensions tucked away what do they care of the little pointless women they stamped all over. Well now we with the help of the wonderful WASPI organisation are fighting for those women. DWP has a lot to answer for and hopefully we will get the compensation all those women deserve. The you to the people who are standing up for us you have my undying support

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  16. I had to retire due my ill health shortly before my 60 th birthday but wasn’t to worried about the financial side of things as I was expecting to hear that I would recieve my state pension but nothing didn’t arrive to let me know that they had changed the state pension age . I eventually got in touch with them and was told that they had moved the state pension age so I wouldn’t be getting anything,I was absolutely devastated as we still had our mortgage to pay We have struggled and suffered so much like all,the poor waspi women who were not informed either! Why they keep prolonging the outcome is disgraceful as I am suffering with disabilities and lots more health problems and if things carry on I probably won’t be around as many other waspi women won’t either so would be wonderful if they sorted this matter out once and for all and give the waspi ladies what we are due to!

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  17. I am 67yrs old had to wait 6yrs for my pension I was struggling , I lost my husband before I had my pension , no one told me about having to wait a long time to receive it

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  18. Paid 44+ years into NI (full stamp) left work due to sudden illness and lost my husband before I was pensionable age he had received his. Lost his state pension and half his occupational pension. Own the home so no help – have gone back to work awaiting hip replacement and angina – it’s tough but it is what it is. There are people worse off but feel let down.

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  19. I was born in May 1960. I feel I should be included in any WASPI payment. I am only 1 month out from receiving any compensation. Surely I am entitled to any payment. I am having to work until my pension payment when I am 66. Totally unfair. Not fair I was born in May. Hopefully this will be reviewed please.

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  20. I was made redundant aged 57 from a failing school, teaching. So was forced to take early retirement, which happens in the teaching profession. I have up to 7 autoimmune conditions so had to claim ESA (a humiliating experience) I didn’t know I’d have to wait until I was 66 for my state pension, so had to live off meagre teacher’s pension from aged 57. I’m in a part rent, part buy property, so my mortgage part isn’t paid off until I’m 70. This has all caused me deep distress and, a poorer quality of life.

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  21. I was born in 19954 started work the day after leaving school at 15 .Having 3 children working and nursing both parents very much looking forward to my retirement, exhausted ‘then informed I can’t retire until I’m 67 what a underhanded blow. How much is enough.

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    • Hi I’m reading through all these posts and have just read yours, unless I’ve missed something you should be in receipt of your SP if you were born in 1954! 67 is not correct you need to contact DWP or go onto their online portal and check your NI contributions . I was born July 1954 and have had my SP since reaching 65 years and 10 months. Which was May 2020 I’ll be 70 this year. Good luck

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  22. Would be a life line if they pay out I was born 1958 and struggling brought up 4 kids one with special needs last year had a operation for thyroid issues please help us all get what we deserve

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  23. I was born in 1954 and in 1991 I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Arthritis. I kept working as a single parent but each year became harder and harder. I was desperate for my 60th year so I could stop but then found out I couldn’t retire until I was 66. I was devastated. I was so ill by this time I had to leave my job at 60. I had to sign on as DWP wouldn’t recognise my illness as a disability and this meant travelling regularly to the job centre. Often I was unable to do this and had to take taxis. I was so broke and so depressed.

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  24. I was born 1958 have had no notice about pension age until it was to late. I am still working doing days and evenings with austioproses, my husband retired 7 years ago on a private pension but not enough for myself to retire at 60, then 66. The government is a joke we can pay for refugees which is in the millions but cannot look after their own who have kept this country going for the past 50 years well done government

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  25. Hi thanks to all the wasip females that have work so hard to be here today.iam 64 year old and have worked from 16, every day I cry to have to go to work I am on my own and have to do two jobs I am low and fed up and can’t take much more , please tell me why have they done this to us, we have done all them year’s let us rest with what we have left .thank you for your hard work

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  26. I’ve had to wait 6 years for my pension that money would have come in handy at 60. I could have helped my husband with the bills. I also lost my job during covid again my pension would have helped if I had got it at 60.

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  27. I, like many thousands, had no information regarding the retirement age being incresed! I was born in 1954, I am divorced and have only a state pension. Having worked since I was 15, with limited time off when I had my daughter. I am not eligible for pension credit as I am in receipt of few pounds a week over the limit (lucky me!).
    Therefore I have had to take on a small part-time job to make ends meet, being 70 this year this is not the retirement I envisaged.
    Any amount of financial help regarding this scandal would be helpful and deserved!!!
    Well done WASPI for bringing the misjustice to light.

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  28. I was born in 1954 and worked from 15 yrs until I was 58 when I had to stop to care for my husband after he had 2 strokes..I believed I would get my pension when I was 60 as I NEVER had a letter telling me about the change in age..I had to wait an extra 6 yrs and 7 months..was such a struggle trying to manage on my husbands pension..over £47000 this government has take from me..its an absolute disgrace!!!

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  29. The fight for compensation has been a long drawn out battle which has impacted on choice and lifestyle for so many. I had to work until 66 as couldn’t afford not to without my pension, I’ve struggled with klippel tranaunae syndrome but had to carry on. I feel I should have had quality time to enjoy with friend’s family and grandchildren and applaud the Solicitors fighting our cause for so long. I’ve happily paid towards keeping it going as feel so strongly about getting justice for all Waspi Women without further delay!!

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  30. I was born in 1954 and was hoping to retire when I was 60 I worked as a care assistant and am crippled with athritis I had to struggle on for a extra 5 years and was in considerable pain each and every day I only found out I wouldend get my pension one month before I was due to retire

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  31. How many more ladies have to pass on before they are given compensation due or are they stalling so they pay a few that’s left ?

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  32. I was born 1956 , retirement was delayed no letter was received had to live on my divorce pay out . I just wanted to say i do feel for those that have had to sell homes but please don’t forget those in rented accommodation who had nothing to sell and living on their savings.

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    • I fear it will be kicked down the road. Whatever the amount it won’t be tax free, not a chance. However 10k lets them off the hook lightly. Counting the 6 years pension lost from 60 to 66 as I have done, comes to well over £50k+ By the time payments if the materialise come, most WASPI will be gone.

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  33. I am one of these ladies
    I have worked all my life , housewiife mother to 3 now have grandchildren
    Looked after my own mum and dad
    Intended to work to 66 pension age
    But had to finish due to my health at 65
    Recently diagnosed with clot on lung
    Never smoked or drank only very odd occasion to celebrate
    I know I am lucky to still be here but there
    As been millions of women who have passed away and would have had to work till 66
    Its absolutely disgusting waspi are not asking for a fortune just a little to help with there retirement which they wouldn’t have to have had the government let it stay at 60 pension age
    How long do they think people can go on working for ?
    I know a big majority that’s retired and ended up with serious illness or something serious that’s took there life
    Work all your life to not have retirement
    Disgusting !!!
    But yet they will pay benefits and pip
    Willy nilly ,throwing money at them ,
    Extra help if you are alcoholic or drugs
    And never worked .
    And they begrudge helping oap what’s worked hard for this country
    Well done to all waspi women who have given there time to fight through this
    And hope you can enjoy a better retirement
    Good luck to you all

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  34. I was born in 1955 and have paid 51yrs stamp .I had to retire at 63 due to arthritis in my knees and back. I could not claim anything and had to rely on my partner to keep me. This was not what I wanted ,I thought I could retire at 60 and be ok. But due to not knowing it meant I worked over 60 in a lot of pain.

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  35. I have been a Carer for Mum and Dad for 17 years on a pittance called the Carers Allowance.
    Retired in November and guess what. I can’t claim 2 benefits so they have cancelled my £300 Carers Allowance per Month, so my Pension is the equivalent of £500 a month.
    Since when has the State Pension been a benefit, l have paid my full dues all my working life… Funny that

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  36. I.m 65 ,I will be 66 in October this year. I.ve had to retire January just gone. Health not what it was .I,m a cleaner and work load was very demanding ,now I suffer with tendinitis which is very painful in my hands and arms. Won.t get my oension till October so now having to live on universal credit. Disgrace having worked all my life.

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  37. I have worked since the age of 15 years old. A severe osteoarthritis sufferer. I never married or had children , always had a full time job , l took out various insurances to assist , however the mortgage protection l took out would only cover me till 60 after that they said good by as they said l was too much of a risk at that age. At the time l signed up for this my retiring age was 60 , to work another six years with osteoarthritis has done more damage to my well being. It didn’t matter to the insurance company that the government had moved the goal post unbeknown to me. So me trying to look after myself was only trashed by the government ,

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  38. I am now 70 and was planning on retiring at 60 then I was told I wouldn’t get my state pension till 2019 I was a single parent and suffering severe depression and was made to go to try and get a job I had to see a counsellor this action didn’t help my situation and suffered long term I was notified of the age increase till if was too late .we have been waiting long enough and many women have sadly passed away this isn’t acceptable get your finger out before more of us ladies pass

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  39. I was born in 1953 worked for the NHS for 30 years put my retirement in when I was 60.I never got any worning about the age change so I had to work on the nurse bank for another 3years 9 months before I got my pension.

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  40. My partner was born 1957 and was not sent a letter either to tell her she would not get her state pension when she expected to get it at 60. The result is she has had to wait the extra 6 more years to then receive her pension. When she went to claim job seekers she was told that she would not get any allowance as she lives as a couple with me the younger person who works and that i would have to support her until she gets her state pension in another 6 years time. That is what I did,i supported her financially until she received her State Pension. While I was supporting her during the extra six years waiting for her to be paid her state pension ,I had a Stroke which has caused some brain tissue damage,my partner was also diagnosed with COPD stage 4 and Colitis which she was prescribed and diagnosed by her doctor and she takes medication prescribed by her doctors to help her breathing and mobility. Since having been diagnosed in 2013 with long term diabetes disability I was awarded Ongoing Pip by the DWP. My partner also was awarded Ongoing Pip by the DWP. Pip was awarded by the DWP to both of us on separate tribunal cases after doing a mandatory reconciliation asking the DWP to look at both claims again. After supplying further medical evidence to the DWP through the tribunal we were both awarded on separate Pip claims an Ongoing award of Pip in both our favours by the DWP officer that dealt with our Pip appeals and we we’re sent the award letters through the post, although a text message was also sent to our separate phones to confirm our Ongoing Pip awards in our favour. It is an absolute disgrace how this government treat people who have paid into the system through there wages national insurance contributions and then not given any notice of policy changes made to there pensions in writing or given enough time to make financial changes in advance of those pension dates changes that the government were going to impose. I used all my savings to support us until my partner got her state pension six years after she should of got it,and now because she has got her pension the rules are if you live as a mixed age couple she is now supporting me until I reach my state pension age as we can not get Pension Credit until me the younger person living together with my partner as a couple reaches state pension age and then i can claim Pension Credit as a mixed age couple within the rules if it’s still there to claim. The £10,000 payment to my partner and others who have waited and even those who have passed will go some way to compensate the losses of these women and there families too ,it’s only what every Waspi women deserve and what they are entitled to and more.

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  41. Paid 48 years of national insurance and tax Born in 1958 brought two children into the world who also pay there taxes been a unpaid carer for two relatives the government can always find money foreign aid what about people who pay into the system i feel robed

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  42. I was born in 1952 and only had to work an extra 2 half years but had no notification whatsoever. I actually keftmy career early (as it was a stressful job in finance) thinking I had enough savings to tie me over. By the time I realised the change I had been out of my career too long to just slot back in and consequently had to get a lower paid job in retail. I lost my home (and now lodge) as I am single and mortgage was too much. I have this morning been diagnosed with breast cancer so this compensation would be welcomed.

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  43. My wife was born in1958 and as lost 6 years pension we just do not see this government paying out any money for this it is a disgrace

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  44. I was born in 1957 and have worked from the age 16 till I was 59. Sadly due to ill health had to stop working due to an injury at work. Worked in a franchisePost Office which was ran on a shoe string!! so ran on little hours. Heavy lifting caused me to take sick leave. Since leaving I have never claimed any benefits but thankfully my husband was working otherwise I dread to think how I would have coped if financially !! Even through I worked in a PO I only heard through the grapevine that I had to work till I was 65 then it was raised to 66. I have had noinformation about the increase just by word of mouth. It wasn’t till I heard about Waspi women who were fighting for us women born in the 50’s. I now have had a couple of months collecting my pension and find a big difference in our finances!! But it’s sad I couldn’t work until I was 67 due to ill health. I am sure they are 1000’s of women in the situation as myself and sadly even more worse than me.

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  45. Why does it state that the women who where due to retire at 60 and couldn’t retire until 65 are the most likely ones who will get a payout …I couldn’t retire until I was 66 had no notice until 1 year before 60 to say I wouldn’t be retiring until I was 66yrs of age ..so that meant i had to work an extra 6 yrs before I could claim my pension I have always worked from the age of 15 and paid all my taxes I thought correct me if I am wrong that all waspi women born in the 50s were affected ..I had to cash my private pension in to survive and due to unforeseen circumstances I had to give up work due to my husband’s ill health ..so how does that work

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  46. I am a 69 year old woman I worked in a preSchool till I was 65 then due to I’ll health had to retire I didn’t have any correspondence from the DWP about changes to the retirement age

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  47. I am a 69 year old woman and was not made aware of the new pension age.
    So, when I did find out it was a real shock.
    I carried on working till’ my 65th year, but due extreme pressure in my work place, I could not carry on as my mental health was extremely compromised.
    However, to enable me to do that I had to sell my house for a cheaper property over 100miles from all of my family. It was a real wrench but my husband had been made redundant 5 years previously so my income was relayed upon. We lived off the money that we made on the sale of our home . It is still very difficult and I now do a daily cleaning job to enable us to get by. A compensation should be made to ALL waspi women, that is the very least that they could do

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  48. Like many women i have worked since I was 16 I am due to retire in august I am struggling with arthritis but keep going it’s disgusting that we at to wait to get what we have paid into over the years

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  49. I’m a 72 year old woman who worked from 15yrs old, looking after my children and elderly parents, this day and age majority of young people don’t start work till there at least 18yrs old, so we have provided more years NHS payments than they ever will, I feel we definitely are entitled to compensation

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  50. am a 69 year old woman and was not made aware of the new pension age.
    So, when I did find out it was a real shock.
    I carried on working till’ my 65th year, but due extreme pressure in my work place, I could not carry on as my mental health was extremely compromised.
    However, to enable me to do that I had to sell my house for a cheaper property over 100miles from all of my family. It was a real wrench but my husband had been made redundant 5 years previously so my income was relayed upon. We lived off the money that we made on the sale of our home . It is still very difficult and I now do a daily cleaning job to enable us to get by. A compensation should be made to ALL waspi women, that is the very least that they could do

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  51. After reading Tina’s comment on here, I agree they will wriggle their way out of paying us anything. It’s an absolute travesty. I’m 70 this year and have struggled for years, I only had my state pension to rely on. Didn’t even know there was such a thing as private pension, certainly not where I worked. This Country treats its elderly appallingly. And of course the triple lock will be done away with soon, you can bet. There is not one political party anymore for the people, they get in power and line their own pockets with their greed and lying ways.

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  52. I am now 68 and like most ladies I wasn’t informed that I had to work till I was 66 I was working full time up to then because my husband had to finish work 4years earlier than me due to ill health he wastent on his state pension neither do I had to carry on doing full time hours to pay the bills it really isn’t fair I myself had 49years national insurance stamps in please do the right thing like everyone that money would make a difference

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  53. I was born in 1953. Started work August 1968. Worked all my life and expected to finish at 60. I was told by colleagues at work that I couldn’t retire at 60 and was totally shocked. I had received no letter and initially thought they were joking. After confirming I would have to work until I was 64 and not being able to afford to finish without a pension, I had to continue for another 4 years. Those 4 years were the longest ever. Well done Waspi campaigners for what you have done so far. Let’s hope for a positive outcome

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  54. I’m am one of those ladies born in the 1950s , sustained industrial injuries at work and had to retire. I was looking forward for my pension when I reached 60 years old. Thanks for the WASPI ladies they are strong people with integrity. I hope the government will do the right thing and compensate all of us women who suffer from this injustice. Ladies remember the ballot box.

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  55. I was born in 1955 and worked an extra 6 yrs due to government changes I struggled terribly with rheumatoid arthritis and spondylitis in back making it difficult to walk shame on government.

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  56. I am 69 and planed my retirement at 60 as I have advanced osteoarthritis and was struggling with my very busy job and long hours . I continued working but has time went by and the age of retirement went up again to 66 I had to reduce my hours at work which financially wasn’t ideal but I had no choice. I have worked since I was 15 and feel women of my age have been very badly treated. Alot of Waspi Women
    are no longer with us which is very sad o Justice for them 😥

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  57. I was born 1956 left school at 15 worked all of the time except when my children born I had bilateral knee replacement, s at 51 then at 62 I had a tumour removed from my bowel I have asthma and copd and I still work as the cost of living has ment I have 2 carry on working if I get 10,000 it will definitely help I would retire before I drop off the back ,the should definitely waver the pension owed as equal rights was What women wanted at the time the age was 65 ,then they put it up to 66,. They money that each of us waspi ladies has lost is a lot more than 10,000 so the government has gained from our loss show some compassion.

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  58. If we get it will they then make us pay tax on it after it takes us over the £12,570 threshold? I had to wait 6 years 1 month 14 day for my pension (born Nov 54) I had two changes of date. I will believe it when it is on my bank. 🐝

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  59. I was born in 1957. I’ve just got my pension in December 2023 as I couldn’t work as I have a anxiety disorder & was living on benefits. So it would of been nice to get a pension at 60. So fair Play to waspi women who have worked hard to get this compensation from the government. But would be good even if we got something for all those years. Good luck with it lady’s 🤞

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  60. I’ve worked all my life and should have retired at 66, I get the full pension but with inflation it doesn’t cover the every day things. I’ve had to carry on working and do night shift 12 hours.Basically I’m tired out and would love to retire properly and enjoy my Grandchildren.Im 68 this year 😞

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  61. I was born in 1955 I have been rob of my pension!! I have Rheumatoid Arthritis and had to continue to work without choice it’s a disgrace not given the correct notice to plan anything for our my future!! Thank you for all the help you have done

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  62. I never had any notification about the increase in pension age. I had plans to retire and help with the grandchildren. But I continued to work and help at the same time. I worked all my life and I reach 66 in December this year. . I had to retire 2 years ago due to I’ll health but I don’t claim any Benefits. My husband continues to work to care for us both. He’s retirement is now 67 at the moment. I doubt it will stay that age. He is also unwell but we have no other option. We still have a mortgage. Sadly I doubt we will be well enough to have a nice retirement line we thought we would. I want to thank Waspi for continuing this fight for our rights. A big well done and thank you

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  63. I worked for local gov. For over 32 years and was ill with thyroid, high BP and spinal stenosis, ongoing sciatica and was born in 1954.Brought up two children literally alone with no help from their father and was actually called in to the DWP to ask why I hadn’t found where their father was as it was’ it worth their while chasing him as I was providing for them’!!
    As I reached 60 .. I too saw the news and cried.
    I had a mortgage ( which they encouraged to extend to 65) & soldiers on until I was 64 and was exhausted working in social services and doing appropriate Adult work & out of hours to serve my community and keep a roof over our heads.
    I then got my ‘lump sum’ and had to use it to survive the mortgage payments and rise in costs.
    I still have to do a part time job at the age of 69.
    I’m tired, tearful, in pain, angry and totally dissolusioned.
    No doubt if I were lucky enough to get this derisory amount .. like my work pension.. it will be taxed.
    I am losing faith.
    I did the right thing by helping the state and community , paid tax and I know that if I’d gone at 60 I would not be physically as unwell as I am now

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  64. A real travesty. The NHS will be picking up the cost of so many women’s mental and physical health issues resulting from this.
    Not easy finding a new job when over 60 and female…..

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  65. I am 69 and worked right up until I was 60 full time. I took on part time work when I realised the pension I thought I was due wasn’t given to me until I was nearly 66. Had I knew this 10 years before retirement I could have planned accordingly. Like many others I had no notification and news on changes were kept very low profile in the media – just as the WASPI cause is (no media coverage).
    Thank you to all the mps supporting us. It is a shame political leaders of all parties are making this a priority – what a vote winner this would be.

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  66. I was born in 1954 I worked all my life by my 60th birthday I had hoped I would get my pension but apparently they’d changed it to 66 What? No letter or anything I was poorly by this time but could not take time off I hope they make this injustice right maybe we need a program to show the injustice this has caused Lots of women have died without receiving compensation I am a waspi woman and I thank them for all they have done

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  67. Denise Lee.
    I am a waspi woman ,worked from the age of 15 ,to 59 had to pack in work as I had a brain hemorrhage. I have been on my own since 2006 always worked never been on benefits, didn’t want to bring my 2 girls up on benefits. Sometimes had 2 jobs ..I looked after people at the end of life .loved my work done it for over years .I’m a hairdresser so always been in work to find out I couldn’t retire when I needed to .I have been on universal credit for 6 years ,I hate the thought getting to 59 and having to claim it ..like the rest of you ladies never got told I couldn’t retire .its a disgrace, we payed in the system we should get what we are owed..
    Denise from Southport.

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  68. I got my pension when I was 66 I was born in the 50;s I’m not sure if I will get any money but it would be very welcome if I did

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  69. Well done Waspi ladies I was born in 1958 and am still working 6pm to midnight at local hospital it’s appalling how all the women in question have been treated more so the poor souls who have passed away before this issue is resolved

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  70. The increase from 60 to 65 and then to 66 was a massive hike, whereas men are having their pension ages increased gradually. More female discrimination. Outrageous.

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  71. I was born in 1958. I worked for the DWP for 10 years and when the pension change came in I did not receive any notification of the change to my pension age through my employer. I only found out about it through gossip at work. I suffer from depression , osteoporosis and asthma and not being told about the change from my employer or receiving any notification put me in a worse state of mind and I have struggled from this since leaving the DWP. I feel let down by this government. Many WASPI women have died waiting for the result of this campaign and I feel the government are dragging their heels over compensation in the hope they will not have to pay out as much as some women have already passed away. I wanted to enjoy my retirement and enjoy my time with family but instead i feel tired and drained , less able to get around and it’s family that are having to look after me, instead of me enjoying time with my grandchildren.

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  72. Thank you WASPI campaigners and MPs who are fighting for our rights. I too found out by accident that state pension age increased by 5 years to 65 and then to add insult to injury by a further year to 66. No time to adjust financial plans I’d been making during working life. I agree with others we need more publicity like Post Office scandal

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  73. I was born July 1954 worked from the day I left school at fifteen. Had to retire early at 59 as the job was getting to demanding (hospitality)Had to wait till nearly 66 for my pension, so have lost out big style.I won’t hold my breath, same as the injustice the post office people, they owe us.!!!!!

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  74. If we do ever receive our compensation it would only be right. I started working at the age of 16 and entered into a contract whereby the government would give me a pension payment once I reached the age of 60. I carried on working and planned my economics accordingly but without enough notice to reassess my position they changed that contract taking away nearly 6 years of my payment. This is both unfair and immoral.

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  75. It is not only the money we have lost, most importantly we have lost 6 years of our retirement! My husband is 8 years older than me, but I had no idea I would be penalised for that when I started work at 16 years of age. The government broke their contract with me, who else would get away with that in Law!?

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  76. I was born November 54. I was expecting to retire at 60. I too suffered ill health. I have osteoporosis and chronic kidney disease. I had a very hard physical job working 5 hours a day. As I was divorced I had to take a second job 3 extra hours a day . this too was hard physical work. Finding out I had to do this till I was 66 was devastating. So thank you waspi ladies for fighting for the injustice done to. Us all.

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  77. Born 1958 battling with terminal cancer still have to work to make ends meet perhaps the government and dwp heads should try being in my shoes struggling with treatment working to pay bills . I think not . Keep the good fight giong waspi’s

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  78. I believe this cohort of women should receive due compensation, but in reality can the government afford to give £10k or more to around 3.5m women. Pre Covid I’d like to think yes, but I honestly can’t see it happening. I hope I am wrong of course, especially because of the women who have suffered financial hardship because of the changes to SPA. May be the government will look to means test any compensation as they may argue that not all women have suffered financially because of the change. Let’s hope it’s sorted out sooner rather than later.

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  79. I was born august 1955 and was looking forward to my retirement then got that dreaded letter saying that I’d got to work another six years I’d already had a letter saying I’d got full stamps and I could retire at sixty then got that 😖😖

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  80. I was born in may 1954 no letter nothing had to work till I was 65 9 months was in a lot of dept had to go into a IVA plan for 5 years we should not have to wait for years to get our compansion it’s just not fair they stole our money I lost over 49 thousand pound in that nearly 6 years just not fair at all

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